Progression is a must in the gym to see results. Self-regulation and progression methods for intermediates are very important points when it comes to maintaining adequate progress once we enter the intermediate phase. In this article you have several examples of simple and effective progressions to keep moving forward once you leave the beginner stage behind and progress becomes somewhat more complex.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
LINEAR PERIODIZATION
LINEAR PERIODIZATION VOLUME/INTENSITY
LINEAR PERIODIZATION WITH PERCENTAGE REDUCTION
RPE – PERCEIVED SCALE OF EFFORT
METHOD 1 – KILAJE DOWN
METHOD 2 – VOLUME SERIES
Ending

When you start training seriously, you’re at a fabulous stage where gains and progression are outrageous. It is a period that does not have a very short duration and is known as the rookie’s earnings.

It is not strange that in that period if nutrition is correct, rest is sufficient and the training is well thought out you can gain several kg of muscle in a few months and that the strength improves training to training. It’s the “honeymoon” stage to put it mildly, so you have to make the most of it.

Being able to progress literally linearly in each workout usually the load progression for these people just getting started is extremely simple. Do multi-articular exercises frequently and put more and more weight on the bar. And from time to time, make a small download and then continue. It’s so simple because a rookie makes progress with that and it’s the most optimal thing. It is the progression used, for example, in the fullbody routine for novices.

Why get complicated with complex progressions when the simplest is what gives the best results? Exactly.

Unfortunately this does not last forever, and that is when in my opinion a person ceases to be a rookie and becomes intermediate, when linear progression no longer works and you have to start to journalize and establish some somewhat more complex methods to keep moving forward.

Because in the end that’s the key to everything: moving forward.
Many gym buffs go to training every day without knowing what to do, or how much weight to throw or how much weight they lifted the previous session. They don’t know which training volume they handle, or which method to progress best suits their circumstances and characteristics. And what happens, that after two years they are exactly the same and end up sending it to the horn. normal.

In this article I will explain some of these methods that I personally find most useful.

Before I start with the article girl, I want to let you know a couple of things:

Here are examples of some progression methods, but you’ll see that there’s a lot of variability within the same method for applying variations. With this what I intend is that you understand how it is done so that you and experiment, do not say “do this and point”.
The item is full of numbers and percentages. It’s not complicated and I want to think I’ve written it as simply as possible, but at first it can seem a bit intimidating if you’re not used to it. It’s okay, just take it easy and you’ll see it seems more complicated than it actually is.
That said, let’s get to it.

LINEAR PERIODIZATION
In this first model the main idea is that the volume and intensity will be inversely related. That is, we will start the mesocycle with a high training volume and a low intensity (remember that the intensity is the % of the 1RM that we use. 95% of the 1RM will be more intense than 75% of it, for example) and we will invest it so that we finish the mesocycle with a lower training volume but with a higher intensity.

The idea of this progression is that we start working with a high volume to create a stimulus that generates hypertrophy properly and gradually use that to be able to apply more force in the exercise when we increase the intensity.
Let’s give an example of a 4-week-old mesocycle.
Let’s assume that we do it for a press bench and that the 1RM is 120kg

WEEK 1: 3 sets of 10 repetitions with 75kg
WEEK 2: 3 sets of 8 repetitions with 80kg
WEEK 3: 3 sets of 5 repetitions 87.5kg
WEEK 4: Unload 5 repetitions with 75kg

We repeat the cycle with 1.25kg more per side. Ideally we will be able to use micro discs to make the total weight gains smaller, but to start increases of 1.25kg per side in torso and 2.5/5kg exercises per side are usually acceptable. Especially in exercises like Dead Weight, Hip Thrust or Squat that generally tolerate more pronounced weight gains.

As you can see, this structure should not be with these repetitions or with this duration. Let’s give an example with more weeks of mesocycle and different progression between microcycle.

WEEK 1: 3 sets of 8 repetitions
WEEK 2: 3 sets of 7 repetitions
WEEK 3: 3 sets of 6 repetitions
WEEK 4: 3 sets of 5 repetitions
WEEK 5: 3 sets of 4 repetitions
WEEK 6: 3 sets of 3 repetitions
WEEK 7: Download (end of mesocycle)
Resume the next one with a weight gain.

We can make small blocks in which we maintain the volume and intensity within the general periodization, but always maintaining that structure of investing volume and intensity. A clear example would be:

WEEK 1: 3 series of 10 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 2: 3 series of 10 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 3: 2 series of 10 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 4: 3 series of 7 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 5: 3 sets of 7 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 6: 2 series of 7 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 7: 3 series of 5 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 8: 3 series of 5 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 9: 2 series of 5 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 10: 3 series of 3 repetitions at 90%
WEEK 11: 3 series of 3 repetitions at 90%
WEEK 12: 2 series of 3 repetitions at 90%
WEEK 13: 3 series of 2 repetitions at 95%
WEEK 14: 2 series of 2 repetitions at 95%
WEEK 15: Peaking 1×1 to 100%
WEEK 16: DOWNLOAD 1 series of 6 repetitions at 60%

In this case, every 3 weeks there is a slight reduction in volume to optimize recovery before increasing the intensity in the next week.

LINEAR PERIODIZATION VOLUME/INTENSITY
This method of progression will take into account the increase in the volume of series also within the previous equation.

The philosophy behind it is the same, start with a high volume and low intensity and gradually transfer to low volume and high intensity, but here we will play not only with the number of repetitions of the series, but the number of total series per session, which will increase progressively.

Let’s look at an example:

WEEK 1: 3 series of 10 repetitions at 70%
WEEK 2: 4 series of 10 repetitions at 70%
WEEK 3: 5 series of 10 repetitions at 70%
WEEK 4: 3 series of 8 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 5: 4 series of 8 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 6: 5 series of 8 repetitions at 75%
WEEK 7: 3 series of 5 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 8: 4 series of 5 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 9: 5 series of 5 repetitions at 80%
WEEK 10: 3 series of 3 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 11: 4 series of 3 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 12: 5 series of 3 repetitions at 85%
WEEK 13: 3 series of 1 repetitions at 95%
WEEK 14: PEAKING 1×1 to 100% Try to establish a new MRI
WEEK 15: DOWNLOAD (end of mesocycle)

LINEAR PERIODIZATION WITH PERCENTAGE REDUCTION
In this modality, popularized by Greg Knuckols (although it is before him), we follow the same general pattern, but the idea is that we will perform 3 total series per exercise within the progression that will have the following structure:

An initial series with the weight you touch for the session
A second series with a total weight reduction of 5%. We’ll match the replays from the first series.
A third series with another 5% reduction. In this series we will try to overcome the replays of the first series.
After each session we will gain weight in the exercise as follows:

2.5kg for vertical presses
5kg for horizontal presses
7.5kg for knee dominants
10kg for hip dominants
The idea is that we increase the weight of each session and try by all means not to lose repetitions in the initial series. Obviously we will lose them, but our intention must be to keep the number as much as possible. We will start with 70% of the 1RM as the initial weight and gradually increase it until we do a series of 3 repetitions. That’s where the mesocycle will end and we’ll unload.

Let’s look at a hypothetical example with the Military Press, assuming an 1RM of 80kg

WEEK 1
1 series of 12 repetitions with 55kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 12 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 15 repetitions
WEEK 2 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 12 repetitions 57.5kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 12 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 13 repetitions
WEEK 3 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 10 repetitions 60kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 10 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 12 repetitions
WEEK 4 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 8 repetitions 62.5 kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 8 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 10 repetitions
WEEK 5 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 7 repetitions 65kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 7 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 9 repetitions
WEEK 6 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 6 repetitions 67.5kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 6 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 7 repetitions
WEEK 7 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 5 repetitions 70kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 5 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 7 repetitions
WEEK 8 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 4 repetitions 72.5kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 4 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 6 repetitions
WEEK 9 (UP 2.5KG)
1 series of 3 repetitions 75kg
Reduced 5%: 1 series of 3 repetitions
We reduced another 5%: 1 series of 5 repetitions
We reach a weight that we can make a series of 3 repetitions, so it will play download.

WEEK 10 (DOWNLOAD)
5 sets of 5 with 60kg
WEEK 11 (PEAKING)
We tested a new 1RM that will be higher than set before starting the entire mesocycle.
Once we find it we start a new mesocycle again with 70% of the new 1RM and add 2.5kg each training again until we reach series of 3.

Regulation
Self-regulation is a way forward in which we take into account the physical state of the day itself to determine the amount of training volume that the body is able to tolerate and therefore the one that we have to give it in that same session.

Self-regulation really is a method that makes much more sense than strict planning because it is clear that it is not every day that we are in the same physical condition and it is a fact that 1RM fluctuates daily, so making estimates of it based on the 1RM of a single day is not too reliable in general.

That is, if we do a peaking very well done and we take at the end of an entire preparation a 1RM of squat of 190kg (for example) that does not mean that every day from that date your 1RM is always 190. The reality is that 1RM is taken in very specific circumstances and after a focused stage to maximize that brand, and does not mean that after 2 months on a day you have had a fight with the relative, you have eaten little, you are stressed by a complicated exam in which you play the subject and you have also slept a few hours less for that fact you have the same mark then.

It’s just that he doesn’t even fuck.

Therefore, self-regulation allows us to adapt the volume of training to the circumstances of the session we are conducting and to the capacity we have to tolerate and adapt to a certain volume.
Before we continue with the examples of progression with self-regulation we must explain a vital tool to be able to carry out this method. And the tool is the perceived scale of effort.

RPE – PERCEIVED SCALE OF EFFORT
The RPE scale is nothing more than assigning a number (within a scale of 1-10) to the effort of making a certain movement with the weight we have used. We explain it more simply:

10 on the RPE scale means we’ve done 100%. We couldn’t have done any more repetitions.
9.5 on the RPE scale is that we probably couldn’t have done one more repetition, but we could have put a little more weight on the bar.
9 means I’m sure we could have done 1 more repetition. We left 1 repetition in the bedroom.
8.5 is that we could probably have done two more. A sure repetition, and probably another.
8 is that we have left 2 safe repetitions in the chamber.

Beyond 7.5 it is difficult to measure it and it usually takes a lot of knowledge of yourself and experience in the gym to be able to know exactly how many repetitions you had left in the bedroom beyond 3 reps.
An example of RPE would be to make a series of press bench of 10 repetitions with 100kg staying only one repetition in the chamber before reaching the failure. In this case, this series would have been an RPE9.

Once we know what the RPE scale is, let’s apply it to a couple of progression methods.

METHOD 1 – KILAJE DOWN
In this method of self-regulation we will make an initial series with the target RPE that we have previously guided and once this series has been made we will make a reduction in the weight of the bar of the % that we want to accumulate of fatigue. When we have reduced that percentage, we will series with the new kiln and reach the same repetitions as the initial series until we reach the RPE of the initial series.

Obviously when we lower that %, the following series will have a lower RPE, but as we do series the accumulated fatigue will increase and they will cost more and more. The number of series we can do up to the initial RPE will depend on our recoverability and volume tolerance for that day. On a good day you can do more series before you get to the initial RPE, and a bad day, not so many.

Let’s look at a hypothetical example:

INITIAL SERIES: 100kg x 5 in bench press at 9RPE
We’re down 10% to those 100kg.
We do a series of 90kg x 5 to RPE 7
We do a series of 90kg x 5 and this time we get to the RPE8
We do a series of 90kg x 5 and follow RPE8
We do a series of 90kg x 5 and we get to 9RPE, the RPE of the initial series. Exercise completed. We’ve reached 10% fatigue.

On a good day we can do 4 extra series before reaching the initial RPE (as the example above). On a bad day we may do 2 series with 90kg and we’ve already reached 9RPE because we’ve slept badly, or for whatever. One day we’re on fire, we can do 6 series.

METHOD 2 – VOLUME SERIES
This second method of self-regulation is based on making an initial series to a given RPE and then making volume series. These volume series are based on making the same weight as the initial series and the only goal of these series is to reach the same RPE point regardless of the repetitions we achieve in these series.

We may begin to suspect that on a good day in these volume series we will be able to do more repetitions before reaching that perceived effort while on a bad day we will do less. But it doesn’t matter, because the goal is to reach that perceived point of effort, regardless of the volume we make, as that will be dictated by the day’s ability to tolerate volume.

Let’s look at an example. Let’s determine that the initial series we will do to an RPE9 and that we will do 4 volume series.

INITIAL SERIES: 100kg in squat to 8 repetitions reaching 9RPE

In the next 4 series of volume we will continue with 100kg in squat until in each series we reach 9RPE. On a good day, for example, something like this would come out:

VOLUME SERIES 1: 100kg x 7 repetitions to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 2: 100kg x 7 repetitions to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 3: 100kg x 6 repetitions to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 4: 100kg x 5 reps to 9RPE

On a bad day when our body doesn’t tolerate so much volume, for example, something like this would come out:

VOLUME SERIES 1: 100kg x 6 repeats to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 2: 100kg x 5 reps to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 3: 100kg x 3 reps to 9RPE
VOLUME SERIES 4: 100kg x 3 reps to 9RPE

One way to progress with this method is to make an initial range of repetitions in the first series and when we reach the high range with the RPE set, we gain weight and start over.

That is, in the first series for example we do a repeat range from 8-10 to 9RPE. We start the progression with a weight that we can do 8 repetitions to the 9RPE. When we can do the exercise with the same weight reaching 10 repetitions to the 9RPE, we will increase the weight so that with the new weight we make 8 repetitions to the 9RPE.

This range, obviously, can be shaped by us and choose the one we preferred. And the RPE can also be chosen by us.

Ending
So far the article on some methods of progression for intermediates and a fleeting view on self-regulation. At the end of the day, the most important thing in the gym is the progress to be able to see results, and training as we please every day without taking any variables into account or taking into account the assimilable volume or accumulated fatigue will cause the results to slow down or directly stop.

Having more or less precise control of these variables using appropriate methods of progression will cause our progress to accelerate significantly. I hope they served you.

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